Optical Distortion in Tempered or Toughened Glass


In my previous post on Glass Tempering or Toughening Process, I had mentioned how the process is executed and the physics involved (Refer Back). Also a brief mention how the toughened glass quality is assessed after it breaks, this is very important because safety is the reason for we spend on tempering. There are also other issues in terms of quality when glass is tempered. These are mainly optical distortion, roller marks, waviness and bend, edge strength, coating burns, fragmenting, burns, spontaneous breakage, etc.

High Optical Distortion

Quality of tempered glass mainly depends on the quality of equipments used and the quality control procedures adopted. Optical Distortion , is mainly a blurred appearance in images when seen through the glass, as well as on the reflection on the glass. This quality issue in tempered glass is common to all types of glasses. Even though minor levels of optical distortion is present in most of the tempered glasses, but it gets magnified when the quality is that poor and the glass is applied on high rise building facades. The minor level optical distortion is inherent on tempered glass, considering the fact that glass nearly reaches it’s softening point as it is heated up to a temperature of 726 degrees, and also the fact that this glass moves in rollers, therefore it is also called roller wave distortions. Such distortions could be easily identified in reflective and low-e coated glasses. Roller wave distortions could be easily controlled by adopting suitable technology and quality control procedures (use of forced convection furnaces instead of radiation furnaces). Continue reading

Laminated Glass: Myths and Facts


There are major defects happening with laminated glass, if the process is not executed properly. Most prominent of such problems is de-lamination. This happens mainly due to the poor bonding between the glass and PVB sheet. In my previous post on laminated glass basics, I had mentioned about the clean facility requirement for lamination process, if this is not followed in the facility, there are chances for dust to stick on to the PVB and at a later stage, resulting in de-lamination. Waviness in the glass is also another reason for de-lamination: waviness in the glass can happen mainly due to poor quality tempering and even in annealed glass which has high amount of  inherent waviness. De-lamination mainly occur at the edges where chemical bonding is weaker. De-lamination may also happen when the unit is over exposed to water, mason errors (like improper cutting), applying poor quality sealants, etc. Continue reading

Laminated Glass Basics

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Laminated glass is made by sandwiching Poly vinyl butryl (PVB) sheet in between two pieces of glass. Laminated glass offers more safety because when the glass breaks, it keeps sticking on to the PVB sheet in the middle. Apart from … Continue reading