Designing Safely With Glass

Gallery

This gallery contains 1 photo.


Here’s an interesting article by Rick De La Guardia on how to design safely with glass for today’s threats. This article was featured in US Glass Magazine. (Click on the article image to read more and download the entire edition)

Chemically Strengthened Glasses


Here’s an interesting find from Glazette.com. This article claims about a new type of glass tempering, called Chemical Strengthening. It is also claimed in the article that these glasses are 6 to 8 times stronger than annealed glass, where as toughened glass is only 4 to 5 times strong. Most amazing fact is that these glasses could be cut after tempering unlike toughened glasses. However, the breakage pattern for these glasses remain almost the same as annealed glass, which obviously affects its acceptance in terms of safety.

Read the full article here.

Thermal Breakage in Glass


There are many instances where the glass panes in a building tends to crack for itself. This could be attributed to various factors like poor quality glazing, but there is also another factor which causes such breakage and is called thermal breakage. Thermal breakage in glass mainly happens due to the high difference in temperature between two points in a single glass pane, resulting in expansion and contraction in the same pane.

The temperature difference as mentioned above could be a result of many factors, such as difference of temperature between inside and outside, solar intensity in the region where building is located, type of glass (whether it is tinted, reflective, etc.), thickness of the glass, internal ventilation, type of glazing done, partial shade on glass, etc. Of all these factors, solar intensity plays a major role and it differs with geographical location, building orientation, seasons, etc. Continue reading

Laminated Glass: Myths and Facts


There are major defects happening with laminated glass, if the process is not executed properly. Most prominent of such problems is de-lamination. This happens mainly due to the poor bonding between the glass and PVB sheet. In my previous post on laminated glass basics, I had mentioned about the clean facility requirement for lamination process, if this is not followed in the facility, there are chances for dust to stick on to the PVB and at a later stage, resulting in de-lamination. Waviness in the glass is also another reason for de-lamination: waviness in the glass can happen mainly due to poor quality tempering and even in annealed glass which has high amount of  inherent waviness. De-lamination mainly occur at the edges where chemical bonding is weaker. De-lamination may also happen when the unit is over exposed to water, mason errors (like improper cutting), applying poor quality sealants, etc. Continue reading

Laminated Glass Basics

Gallery

This gallery contains 5 photos.


Laminated glass is made by sandwiching Poly vinyl butryl (PVB) sheet in between two pieces of glass. Laminated glass offers more safety because when the glass breaks, it keeps sticking on to the PVB sheet in the middle. Apart from … Continue reading

Glass Tempering or Toughening Process

Gallery

This gallery contains 3 photos.


Annealed float glass when breaks is a safety hazard, just because it breaks into sharp pieces and can injure. Imagine, if an annealed glass applied to a window in the 6th floor of a building, and if it breaks by … Continue reading